Smart Technology Could Save National Parks (Video)

Smart technology is revolutionizing our home lives with integrated devices that all connect to react to our every need. But, what if that type of connectivity could be applied to something altogether bigger.

A new report from the Lancaster University Management School authored by Professor Edward Truch proposes that the Internet of Things, which is essentially connecting the internet to everyday “things” using sensors, could create the first ever smart national parks.

In the United States, there are 417 national parks that annually are left with some neglect or lack of funding due to their size and rural maintenance. The report asserts that parks could benefit greatly, as well as guests, by implementing sensors throughout the entire property and integrating a network that would assist in the exchange of helpful information.

This network could make life simpler for everyone from visitors, to conservationists, to park employees and nearby communities. Essentially, visitors could be informed instantly of emergency situations like storms, to avoid hazardous areas with high water levels, and where to park by indicating available spaces – enhancing safety measures and cutting emissions from running vehicles.

Park employees would also have real time measurements like crowded zones and overfilled trash bins. Information like this may seem minimal, but does a great deal for protecting the environment from overuse and waste. Since the sensors are often small and unnoticeable, there would be no direct harm to the ecosystem or the beautiful views at parks like Yosemite and Yellowstone.

The best benefit, according to Professor Truch, is the long term cost effectiveness of using this his plan. The technology would actually cut spending for many of parks after the initial investment and allow for a lower price of admission for guests. Watch the video below for more information.

Source: Green Matters

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